“Protest is a marathon, has to go the right way.”

Abi Wassa Photographer: (Liron Shemesh)

He has been singing with Idan Raichel for 17 years, appeared in front of Obama and his voice can be heard with huge hits. In an interview to Ynet in honor of the Sigdiada festival, Abi Waasa talks about working with teenagers who confront the police and also refers to the violent protest of the community, “No one came out and ‘Come on mess.’

Who does not know the “Nano Nii” song in the song “From the Depths” that won many parades and was even chosen by Ynet surfers as the greatest hit of the Reichel era.The one who sings the most identified part of the hit and is a customer of a traditional Amharic song (which Esther Rada also renewed) is Avi Wasa, who has been with Reichel for no less than 17 years. As part of working with one of Israel’s leading artists over the past decade, Waasa also appeared in the White House to President Barack Obama and worked with Shoshana Damari. At the same time, he is currently working on his own materials.

So far it sounds very glamorous, American presidents and hits at the top of the chorus, but not everything comes easily to Waasa. In 2015, when he asked to rent an apartment in Tel Aviv, he came across an owner who told him sharply, without hiding, “I do not rent to Ethiopians.” “A terrible feeling. Somehow I overcame the insult and told her, ‘Anyone who rents the house has the right to know if the tenant is working, etc. But what is it not to rent to Ethiopians.

Against the backdrop of such stories, it is easy to understand the wave of protests that swept the country during the summer months, but even after that, Vasa claims such situations can be repeated.”Sure it can happen. First of all, we live in a country that is a postcard group and if there is racism, you can sue. He says with optimism. And if we have already mentioned the protest, it is hard to forget the criticism that the Ethiopian community has drawn on its violent side. “No one came out and ‘come on!’ That’s not the point. Ultimately, in life, when you want to reach some goal, it’s not from now on. It’s a marathon. You have to go the right way. “Our brothers. There’s a whole generation here.

His connection to music began years ago, in the home where Addis Ababa was born in Ethiopia.”There was always music at home. All the time happy. Music connects the people. From there it started.” He immigrated to Israel when he was 7 and a half and occasionally made sure to fly to his native country to visit his grandmother who still lives there and his fellow artists who work there and around the world. This weekend (November 9-7), he will be attending the Tel Aviv Sigdiada festival, which aims to expose the general public to Ethiopian culture and at its opening event will be the president of the state, Robbie Rivlin.

Abi Wasa, Kabra Kasai and Maya Abraham at the performance of the Idan Raichel project (Photo: Oren Agmon)
Abi Wasa, Kabra Kasai and Maya Abraham at the performance of the Idan Raichel project (Photo: Oren Agmon)

Pandika band from Ethiopia (Photo: 18)
Pandika band from Ethiopia (Photo: 18)

“I see it as independence today for the entire community. Our ancestors prayed, made the journey to Zion, Jerusalem. To a country we all dreamed of,” says Waasa of the Sigd holiday. As part of the festival, the Chamber will be presenting plays, the will be a screening of Fig Tree and there will even be a laughing workshop. Among the music performances to be held at the festival, FENDIKA from Ethiopia will come to Israel. Abby Waasa will perform at noon Friday in Chamber 2 with the composition of the musicians, host musician and musician Mark Eliyahu and musician Hewett Nested. “I urge the public to come and take part in this and we would love to see you at the show.” He adds, “We are in an easy time. You have to see the beautiful side.”

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