My Homeland Visit

When my parents and I started to discuss a trip to Honduras, I didn’t think it would be anything more than a normal vacation. I pictured the shopping and touring and my parents’ “let’s soak up everything” attitude. I thought of a new place and taxis and my brother fighting with me over beds in the hotel. Just a normal vacation. It didn’t hit me until we actually arrived in Honduras that this would not be a regular vacation.

As I sat in the hot airport, kicking myself for wearing black shorts, I started thinking. I remembered all the times I had tried to picture Honduras, all the things I had imagined. It hit me that this was my birth country. From that moment on, everywhere we went, I watched in fascination. This was my past, my heritage. Everything seemed as if it were somehow tied to me. I distinctly remember buying a soda and the woman speaking to me in Spanish. How was she to know I had been adopted and lived in the United States? To this woman, I was just like all the other girls who bought Cokes in her store. I was just like everyone else she saw in Honduras.

In Honduras, I felt a great connection with everything. I don’t think another person can really understand that feeling of self discovery I experienced. From a trip that I had thought would be nothing more than shopping and sightseeing came so much more. I left Honduras with a greater understanding of myself as well as the country. To be able to identify with a culture on such a strong level is not something many people have the opportunity to do. I am just thankful that I was one of those people.

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