Identificational Assimilation of Japanese Americans: A Reassessment of Primordialism and Circumstantialism

Abstract

Two contradictory models of ethnic identity — primordialism & circumstantialism — are tested, drawing on data obtained via mail questionnaire & interviews from 40 Japanese Americans & their adult children (N = 106) in Portland, Ore. Focus is on whether the third generation of Japanese Americans retains ethnic identity or has achieved complete assimilation, & factors that impact assimilation. Analysis demonstrates attenuation of ethnic identity between successive generations. However, the seemingly different ethnic identity of the second & third generations does not necessarily evidence the significance of generation in identificational assimilation. Childhood & adult social networks have the greatest effect on ethnic identity. In addition, generational shift does not lead to assimilation if & when successive generations are placed in the same circumstances. 3 Tables, 1 Figure, 1 Appendix, 38 References. Adapted from the source document.

Resources

Related Articles

Archive Search

Search the world's largest online archive of material about Jewish diversity.


Archive Search

Search the world's largest online archive of material about Jewish diversity.


.