The Structure and Measurement of Social Identity

Abstract
Drawing on the work of the Survey Research Center of the U of Michigan on party identification (A. Campbell, G. Gurin, & W. Mitter, THE VOTER DECIDES, Evanston, Ill: Row, Peterson, 1954, & A. Campbell, P. Converse, W. Miller, & D. Stokes, THE AMERICAN VOTER, New York, NY: Wiley, 1964) & the Likert approach to attitude measurement, a procedure is developed for measuring the concept of social identity among a number of individuals with a single instrument. Results of the Twenty Statements Test research were used to compile a wide-ranging sample of 40 stimulus groups (H. Mulford & W. Salisbury, II, “Self-conceptions in a General Population,” in SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONS; A READER IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, J. G. Manis & B. N. Meltzer, Eds, Boston, Mass: Allyn & Bacon, 1967). A sample group of 146 Uc & graduate students at Temple U, Philadelphia were given the questionnaire during a class period. The sexual, racial, & religious make-up of the sample was calculated. Pearson product-moment correlations were measured from the raw data matrix. To extimate the N of meaningful factors present, the Cattell eigen value technique was used. The r matrix was factored & refactored with an iteractive principal axis routine to determine the 7 factors: ‘Jewish’ identity, ‘black M’ identity, ‘sex’ identity, ‘respectable member of the community’ identity, ‘upper status’ identity, ‘blue-collar Roman Catholic’ identity, & ‘white race’ identity. All proved reliable under Cronbach’s alpha test for measurement equivalence, except the ‘blue-collar Roman Catholic’ identity. Applications of the instrument to the study of policy compliance & group support are suggested. 3 Tables. Modified HA.

Resources

Related Articles

Archive Search

Search the world's largest online archive of material about Jewish diversity.


Archive Search

Search the world's largest online archive of material about Jewish diversity.


.