The son of Holocaust hero Chiune Sugihara is setting the record straight about his father’s story

Nobuki Sugihara, second from right, with Chaim Chesler, in blue shirt, and guests of Limmud FSU Minsk at the village of Mir, Belarus, during an unveiling of a plaque for Chiune Sugihara, May 2, 2019. (Boris Brumin)

After decades of relative obscurity, the tale of the Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara has become one of the best-known Holocaust rescue stories, rivaling those of Oskar Schindler and Irena Sendler.

The late Sugihara, who issued thousands of life-saving visas to Jewish refugees in Lithuania in defiance of his pro-Nazi government, became popularly known only about 20 years ago, in part due to the 2000 opening of a museum about him in Japan. A year earlier, a Sugihara museum celebrating his actions had opened in Kaunas, Lithuania.

Amid the growing recognition, one of the Sugihara’s four children, Nobuki, recently began traveling around the world telling audiences about his father’s legacy.

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