Juneteenth

Learn more about the holiday and its significance to Black Jews

Juneteenth 2020 Kabbalat Shabbat Service

Holiday Background

Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, commemorates the announcement of the abolition of slavery in the state of Texas on June 19, 1865. The holiday honors African American heritage and is celebrated by people of all ethnic and racial backgrounds.

Articles about Juneteenth from Our Archive

Juneteenth: Joy in the Midst of Pain

Shekhiynah Larks, Jewish&, 06/18/2020

While the death of George Floyd brings up personal traumas for many us, it’s important to remember that part of self-care is finding joy.

What Juneteenth Means to My Black Jewish Family

Marcella White Campbell, Kveller, 06/18/2020

I wanted to show my children what “biracial” really meant, piecing together their father’s Scottish and Russian Jewish ancestry with my Black Arkansas and San Francisco roots.

What is Juneteenth to a Black Jew?

Chris Harrison, Reformjudaism.org, 06/16/2020

Particularly in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, many have begun learning about the lesser-known but incredibly important holiday of Juneteenth,

History of the Modern Juneteenth Movement

Staff, National Juneteenth Observance Foundation, 06/16/2020

Celebrated on June 19, the term is a portmanteau of June and nineteenth, and is recognized as a state holiday in 45 states of the United States.

Atonement: The Jewish case for black reparations

Gabriel Greschler, The J., 10/04/2019

“This [discrimination] is in my generation’s lifetime. This is not ancient history. There was an injustice done,” “So, the whole question is, what are you going to do about it?”

In Memory of Jim Haugabook z”l

James B. Haugabook (Jun. 3, 1936 – Nov. 2, 2012) had a passionate sense of his roots, and spent his life loving his family, generously helping others in need and speaking out for justice.

Archive Search

Search the world's largest online archive of material about Jewish diversity.